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Wearing My Invisible Crown

Our crown has already been bought and paid for. All we have to do is wear it. — James Baldwin

I’m grateful for a lot: my life is good, my family is good, my God is good. So in addition to keeping my Native American brothers and sisters in my constant prayers, especially those who are currently fighting at Standing Rock, today I give thanks for who I am and for whose I am.

I am a child of God.

Sometimes, I forget who I belong to.

At the last City Chicks Thursday morning devotional, Pastor Alli centered her talk around the theme “You are enough.” It resonated so much with me because as women, we are always trying to do a lot, but sometimes, we try to do it alone, meaning we rely on our own strength to get through stuff.

I definitely do that. I think about all that I have to do and then I start to feel defeated before I even start. But, Romans 8:31 says that “If God is for us, who can be against us?” Letting worry slow me down makes me less effective. If I’m less effective, then I’m messing up before I even start. There’s no room for worry and fear when you’re on your assignment from God. We have victory in Christ before we even ever begin.

Through Him, I can do anything.

I am Bea Ma and Addy’s granddaughter.

Sometimes, I forget who made me.

I come from a long line of strong women — fearless and bold. Both of my mama and daddy’s mothers were some hard working women. In fact, they worked as maids for the same family with opposite shifts when my parents were dating. My parents would drive one to work out in the ‘burbs, pick up the other, and drive back to the city.

Bea Ma, my grandmother on my mother’s side worked at the Executive Club when she first moved to Chicago from Greenwood, Mississippi. Last year, as I walked through a breakfast there, it really hit me what people mean when they say that they’re earning their seat at the table. My grandmother literally made a place for me.

Bea Ma and Addy (my daddy’s mom) worked their fingers to the bone so that their children, and the generations after, wouldn’t have to. They worked so that I could get advanced degrees and speak on panels and use my voice to help those who don’t have one. They worked so that I could teach and give back. They worked because they wanted me to be great, and I will never take that for granted.

Because of them, I can do anything.

Happy Family Day!

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